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Recipes for Canning Veggies


 
 

He who dies with the most toys is nonetheless dead.

Aunt May's Pickled Green Tomatoes
Beans, Snap and Italian
Canned Okra To Fry
Canning Grains
Carrots
Crisp Peppers
Dried Beans
Mixed Vegetables and Soup
Old Fashioned Green Tomato Mincemeat
Pea Soup
Pickled Asparagus
Pickled Bell Peppers
Pickled Brussel Sprouts
Pickled Cabbage Stuffed Peppers
Pickled Cauliflower
Pickled Dilled Beans
Pickled Green Onions
Pickled Okra
Pickled Peppers
Pickled Red Beets
Pickled Red Onions
Pickled Scallions
Pickled Snap Beans
Pickled Squash
Pickled White Onions
Pimento Peppers
Quick Pickled Beets 
Ranch Style Beans
Red Onion Jam
Snap Beans
Succotash
Sweet Corn
Sauerkraut
Shelled Soup Beans
Stewed Tomatoes
String Beans 
Summer Garden in a Jar
Sweet Bell Peppers
Tomato Catsup
Tomato Paste
Tomato Puree
Tomato Sauce
Tomato Soup 
Vegetable Soup
Winter Squash and Pumpkin

 
 
 


***I am not a master canner and merely share recipes from friends and family.


 
Pickled Red Beets

Use small beets whole. Cut larger beets into wedges or 1-inch chunks, or 1/4-inch thick slices.

6 quarts fresh red beets - cooked until fork tender.
4 1/2 cups sugar
4 cups cider vinegar (5% acidity)
1 tsp. (or to taste) canning salt (non-iodized salt)
1/4 tsp. cinnamon (optional)

To cook fresh beets - For tender, freshly picked beets - wash, rinse and drain until all traces of garden soil are removed. Use a small vegetable brush if needed. (Peel larger beets with a thick, tough skin.) Place beets in large heavy boiler or stockpot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium, cover and cook until fork tender, approximately 25 to 30 minutes. Remove from heat; remove beets from pan; set beets aside. Add remaining ingredients to hot beet juice and cook on low heat for 15 minutes, stirring often. Meanwhile, Partially fill a boiling water bath canner with hot water; Set aside.

Pack cooked beets into hot canning jars (Use pint or quart jars; wide mouth jars work best here). Pour hot beet juice mixture into each jar, leaving 1/4" headspace. Run a thin spatula or non-metallic utensil through each jar to remove air bubbles. Add additional liquid to jars if needed. Wipe jar rims with a damp paper towel. Place a new lid on each jar, followed by a screw band. Screw bands tightly onto jars. Place filled jars in rack in a water bath canner. Add additional hot water to canner to cover jars. Jars should be completely immersed...tops of jars should be at least 1" below water level. Process in boiling water bath for 30 minutes.(begin timing as soon as water begins to boil). Remove jars from canner; Place jars on a towel covered kitchen counter or table. After jars have cooled for several hours, test seals. Lid should have an indentation in center that stays down when pressed.

Note: I love pickled beets--especially when having cornbread and pinto beans. Yummy. Mom never added the cinnamon to her jars,though.



Old Fashioned Green Tomato Mincemeat

3 quarts chopped green tomatoes
1 1/2 quarts peeled, chopped tart apples
2 cups raisins
1 cup currants
1/2 cup diced candied citron, lemon or orange peel
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons salt
3 cups brown sugar, firmly packed
3/4 cup Vinegar
1/4 cup lemon juice

Combine all ingredients in a large heavy pan. (Omit cloves if you plan to freeze mincemeat.) Cook mixture slowly until it is tender and thick, about 1 hour or more. Stir frequently to prevent sticking. To can, pour boiling mixture into hot, sterile jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace; seal promptly. Process in a boiling water bath for 20 minutes. Store in a cool dry place.

To freeze, pack cold mincemeat into freezer jars or containers, leaving about an inch headspace for expansion. Seal and freeze promptly.

Makes about 5 to 6 quarts of green tomato mincemeat



Beans, Snap and Italian -- Pieces

Green and wax

An average of 14 pounds is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 9 pounds is needed per
canner load of 9 pints. A bushel weighs 30 pounds and yields 12 to 20 quarts -- an average of 2 pounds per
quart.

 Select filled but tender, crisp pods. Remove and discard diseased and rusty pods.

Wash beans and trim ends. Leave whole or cut or snap into 1-inch pieces.

Hot pack-- Cover with boiling water; boil 5 minutes.
Fill jars, loosely leaving 1-inch headspace.

Raw pack -- Fill jars tightly with raw beans, leaving 1-inch headspace. Add 1 teaspoon of canning salt per quart
to the jar, if desired. Add boiling water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.

Recommended process time for SNAP AND ITALIAN BEANS in a dial-gauge pressure canner, use 11 lb pressure. Pints, 20 minutes, quarts 25 minutes. For weighted gauge canner, use 10 lb. pressure unless you need to adjust for higher altitudes.



Pickled Bell Peppers

7 lb. firm bell peppers
3 l/2 cups sugar
3 cups vinegar (5% acidity)
3 cups water
9 cloves garlic
4 l/2 tsp. canning or pickling salt

YIELD: About 9 pints

Wash peppers, cut into quarters, remove cores and seeds, and cut away any blemishes. Slice peppers
in strips. Boil vinegar, water and sugar for 1 minute. Add peppers and bring to a boil. Place 1/2 clove of garlic
and 1/4 teaspoon salt in each hot sterile half-pint jar (see sterilization directions following processing times);
double the amounts for pint jars. Add pepper strips and cover with hot vinegar mixture, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.
Adjust lids and process.

Recommended process times for pickled bell peppers in a boiling-water canner is 5 minutes.


To sterilize empty jars, place them right side up on the rack in a boiling -water canner. Fill the canner and jars with hot (not boiling) water to 1 inch above the tops of the jars. Boil 10 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 feet.

At higher elevations, boil 1 additional minute for each additional 1,000 feet elevation. Remove and drain hot sterilized jars one at a time as filled.



These should only be canned in pints or smaller for proper heat penetration.

Pickled Dilled Beans

4 lb. fresh tender green or yellow beans
(5 to 6 inches long)
8 to 16 heads fresh dill
8 cloves garlic (optional)
1/2 cup canning or pickling salt
4 cups white vinegar (5% acidity)
4 cups water
1 tsp. hot red pepper flakes (optional)

YIELD: About 8 pints

Wash and trim ends from beans and cut to 4-inch lengths. In each hot sterile pint jar (see following
directions for sterilizing jars), place 1 to 2 dill heads,and if desired, 1 clove of garlic. Place whole beans
upright in jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Trim beans to ensure proper fit, if necessary. Combine salt, vinegar,
water and pepper flakes (if desired). Bring to a boil.
Add hot solution to beans, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.
Adjust lids and process.

Sterilization of Empty Jars

To sterilize empty jars, place them right side up on the rack in a boiling-water canner. Fill the canner and
jars with hot (not boiling) water to 1 inch above the tops of the jars. Boil 10 minutes at altitudes of less than
1,000 feet. At higher elevations, boil 1 additional minute for each additional 1,000 feet elevation. Remove and drain hot sterilized jars one at a time as filled.

Recommended process time for pickled dilled beans in a boiling-water canner is  5 minutes

Tomato Soup

Yield 16-17 pints

7 quarts tomatoes, chopped
1 bunch celery, chopped, about 7 stalks (4 c. chopped)
5 med. onions, chopped, (3 c.)
1 sm. or 1/2 lg. green pepper, chopped (more if you like peppers)
7 cloves garlic or 3 lg. elephant garlic cloves, chopped.
7 springs fresh parsley, chopped or 3 tbs. dried
6 bay leaves or 1/2 tsp. ground
5 whole cloves or 1/4 tsp. ground
4 tbs. salt
1 c. very hot water
3/4 c. butter or margarine
1 1/2 c. flour
1 1/2 c. sugar
2 tbs. paprika
3 tbs. lemon juice 

Combine first 8 ingredients in large kettle over low fire and cook till all vegetables are tender (about 30 min.). Remove from fire and put through sieve or food mill. Return to kettle to bring up to a boil. Meanwhile melt butter in hot water, add sugar, flour, salt & paprika. Beat into a paste, add slowly  to kettle, stirring to blend. Add lemon juice and stir all until blended.

Bring up to a bubble, lower heat and ladle into hot sterilized pint jars, adjust 2 piece lids and process in pressure canner for 60 minutes at 10 lb. pressure. Adjust pressure for altitude if necessary.
 To serve, add equal amount of water or milk.



String Beans

green beans
1 gal. water
1/2 c. vinegar
1/2 c. salt

Heat all together, then add washed and drained beans.
When it comes to a boil, put in jars and pour liquid to top and seal. Hot water bath for 1/2 hour. When ready to use, pour liquid off and cook. Tastes like fresh picked beans.



Shelled Soup Beans

shelled beans
salt

Get shelled beans from well ripened green beans. Wash
beans well. Put in canning jars; add 1 tsp. salt per
quart. Fill jar with hot boiling water, leaving 1/2-inch
head space. Process in pressure canner, 10 pounds pressure for 30 minutes. Same process canning green beans.

When ready to prepare for the table, open jar, put in cooker, add seasoning and bring to boil.



Ranch Style Beans

10 lb. pinto beans
4 large onions
1 gal. tomato juice
1 qt. catsup
4 oz. chili powder
4 lb. ground beef
1 lb. brown sugar

Wash beans and soak overnight. Cook 1 1/2 hours. Add other ingredients. Mix well. Fill clean jars and add 1
tsp. of canning salt to each quart. Process at 10 pounds for 45 minutes.



Canning Grains

wheat
millet
split peas
dry lentils
rice

Put grains in quart jars with water 1 inch from the top.
Add 1 tsp. of salt. Use these amounts for each of these different grains: 1 1/2 c. wheat, 3/4 c. millet, 1 c. split peas, 1 1/2 c. dry lentils, 1 c. rice. Use 15 pounds of pressure for 60 minutes.



Crisp Peppers

1.  Wash peppers

2.  Cut peppers up discarding stems, and any bad parts.

3.  Place in non-metallic bowl.

4.  Cover peppers with solution of 4qts cold water and 1.5 C pickling salt.

5.  Place bowl in refrigerator for 8-12 hours, stir occasionally.  Don't go over 12 hours peppers skins shrivel.

6.  After waiting period, pour out brine solution, and fill bowl back up with water, swish peppers around, pour out.  Repeat cleaning for a total of three times, and drain thoroughly, set aside.

7.  Sterilize canning jars, in boiling water.

8.  In a sauce pan combine 3 parts (Heinz pickling Vinegar) with 1 part water (distilled or soft water is best), and for each 4 c. of vinegar water solution, add 2-3 tablespoons  sugar.

9.  Bring canning solution in saucepan, and water in canner to 187 F.  Key to crisp peppers is maintaining temperatures between 185 - 190 F.  If it's to hot through in a few ice cubes.

10.  Prepare sealing lids per mfg. instructions, in boiling water.

10.  Place in hot quart jars 1 TBS. fresh minced garlic, 5-8 peppercorns whole.

11.  Pack peppers into hot jars, leaving 1/2 inch head space.

12.  Add 1 tbs. pickling salt to each quart.

13.  Fill jars with pickling solution from saucepan, leaving 1/2 inch head space.

14.  Wipe top of jar with clean damp rag.

15.  Place hot lids on jars, and screw can bands down firmly.

16.  Place jars in boiling bath canner, with water at 187 F., maintain temperature 185-190 F, process for 6 minutes, and pull out cans immediately, and let set on counter undisturbed while they seal.

17.  Allow at least four weeks for flavors to blend, and enjoy.Place a quart in refrigerator overnight before eating.



Canned Okra To Fry

1 gal. fresh okra
6 tbs. vinegar
2 1/2 tbs. canning salt

Cut 1 gallon okra as if to fry. Put in large pan and cover with water. Add 6 tablespoons vinegar and 2 1/2 table-
spoons canning salt. Boil 8 to 10 minutes. Pour into jars and seal. Hot water bath for 10 minutes.

To Cook: Drain liquid and rinse in colander. Do not add salt. Flour or meal and fry like fresh okra.



Pickled Cabbage Stuffed Peppers

green peppers (bell)
cabbage
1 part vinegar
1 part sugar
1 part alum

Mix together vinegar, sugar and alum. Cut stem end off peppers and remove seeds. Grind cabbage fine and add 1 table-spoon salt for each head of cabbage. Stuff peppers with cabbage using plastic swizzle stick. Pack peppers in canning jars (wide mouth best) tightly. Pour heated vinegar, sugar and alum mix to cover peppers, leave top 1 inch empty.
 Adjust canning lids and place jars in water bath. Cold pack quarts 45 minutes; pints 30 minutes.


Pickled Squash

2 lb. squash ( yellow or summer)
3 medium onions
1/4 c. salt
2 c. white vinegar
2 c. sugar
1 tsp. celery seed
1 tsp. turmeric
2 tsp. mustard seed

Wash squash; slice thinly.  Peel onions; slice thinly.  Cover both in water and add salt.  Let stand 1-2 hours. Drain. Bring vinegar and seasonings to a boil and pour over vegetables.  Let stand 3-4 minutes.
Put on burner and bring to boil, stirring, allowing to boil 4 minutes.
Pour into hot sterilized jars and seal.



Pickled Green Onions

1 1/2 c. sugar
1/4 c. water
3/4 c. white vinegar
1/4 tsp. salt
Few drops green food coloring
Few drops yellow food coloring
4 c. sliced onions
1/2 tsp. mustard seed
1/2 tsp. celery seed

In a saucepan, combine sugar, water, vinegar and salt and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Cool. Add a few drops of green and yellow food coloring to syrup to make an attractive green color. In a one quart container combine onions, mustard seed and celery seed. Pour syrup over all.

Cover container and let stand over night. Add more onions to fill container.
Refrigerate for 2 or 3 days before serving. Onions will keep in
refrigerator for up to 3 weeks.



Pickled Brussel Sprouts

To prepare sprouts, soak for 10 min in a cold brine of 1 TBS. salt to 4 c.
water to drive out any bugs.  Rinse well.  Trim/peel to uniform 1" diameter and cut an x in the core to allow brine to penetrate.

Into each pint   place 1 whole dill head, 1 clove fresh garlic, 1/4 tsp.
crushed dried red pepper (I often leave out the red pepper).  Prepare brine of 5 c. vinegar, 5 c. water, 1/2 c. less 1 Tbs. pickling salt) and bring to boil, keeping hot.

Pack spices into jars, then pack sprouts tightly into jars to within 3/4"
from the top. Add boiling brine the 1/2" head space.  Remove any trapped air with non-metallic utensil, wipe top of jar, add lid/band. Process in a BWB for 10 minutes.

Recipe also works for dilly beans.  I often do dilly beans with a mixture of green and yellow beans, very pretty together.

Enjoy!
Ma Pickle



 

Pickled Asparagus

Blue ribbon/top of class
Skamania County Fair, Stevenson, Washington 1997 & 1998

Makes 1 jar, easily multiplied
Takes about 2 lb. per jar

Wash asparagus and snap off tough ends.  Wash pint jar & prepare lids.
Trim stalks of asparagus to fit jar leaving 1/2" head space.  Add to jar 1
tsp. dill weed 2 tsp. pickling salt 1 clove garlic
Pack jar with asparagus (I prefer tops up) Fill jar halfway with white
vinegar then fill with boiling water leaving 1/2" head space. Seal and
adjust lid. Process in BWB canner for 10 minutes.

Let sit for 6 weeks to develop flavor.
 



Sweet Bell Peppers
 

   Leave the skin on, remove seeds.  Cook 3 minutes in some water.  Pack
  the peppers in the jar, add 1 ts. canning salt to each jar, then fill
  to 1" from top with cooking juice.Process in BWB canner for 10 minutes.

  SOURCE: Aunt Julia


Pickled White Onions

Yield: 6 Pints

3 lb. tiny white onions
2 tbs. coarse salt
water
3 c . white vinegar
1/2 c.  sugar
1/2 tsp. whole cloves, tied in a bag
6  dried red pepper pods
6  small bay leaves 

Soak onions and one tablespoon salt 2 hours in water to cover.Remove onions, peel.Soak 48 hours in water to cover, adding the remaining salt. Drain and rinse.

Bring to a boil the vinegar, one c. water, sugar and cloves. Add onions and boil 3 to 5 minutes. Remove bag.

Ladle into hot sterilized jars, covering onions with boiling vinegar mixture.Add a pepper pod and bay leaf to each jar.Seal at once. Let stand six weeks before using.
Process in BWB canner for 10 minutes.

SOURCE: "An Herb and Spice Cook Book", by Craig Claiborne, copyright 1963


Red Onion Jam

7 c. prepared red onions (2 1/2 pounds)
1 1/2 c. apple juice
1/2 c. red wine vinegar
2 tsp.  rubbed sage
1 tsp. pepper
4 c. granulated sugar
1/2 c. firmly packed light brown sugar
1 box Sure Jel Light pectin
1/2 tsp. butter or margarine

Peel, quarter and thinly slice red onions. Measure 7 c. into a large, heavy bottomed saucepan. Add apple juice, vinegar, sage, and pepper; mix thoroughly.

Measure sugars into separate bowls. Mix 1/4 c granulated sugar from measured amount with pectin in small bowl. Stir pectin-sugar mixture into onion mixture in sauce pot. Add butter. Place over high heat; bring to a full
rolling boil, stirring constantly. Immediately stir in remaining sugars.
Bring to a full rolling boil and boil 5 minutes, stirring constantly.
Remove from heat.

Skim off foam and ladle into pint or half-pint jars, leaving 1/4 inch
head space. Process in boiling water canner 10 minutes.



Pimento Peppers

  Remove skins;

  In hot cooking oil 11 - 12 minutes, In water 12 - 15 minutes, In moderately hot oven 6 - 8 minutes.

  Dip quick in cold water, remove seeds. Pack flat in pint jars, adding NO oil or water. Hot water bath 15 minutes.

  Source: Aunt Julia



Pickled Snap Beans

      Yield: 5 Pints

3 lb. tender snap beans
1 1/2 c. water
1 1/2 c. white or cider vinegar
1/2 c. sugar
2 tsp. salt
3  red hot peppers
1 1/2 tsp. dried dill seed
5  cloves garlic, chopped 

Wash the beans thoroughly and snap off the ends. Cook them in the water until just crisp tender.

Meanwhile, simmer covered in a two quart saucepan the vinegar,sugar, salt, red peppers and dill seed.

Add the beans with the water in which they were cooked and simmer, covered, fifteen minutes.

Continue simmering while packing one sterilized jar after another with the beans.Divide the raw garlic among the jars and pour the vinegar mixture over the beans. Fill the jars to 1/8 inch from the top. Seal at once and store in a cool, dry place.Process in BWB canner for 10 minutes.

SOURCE: "An Herb and Spice Cook Book", by Craig Claiborne, copyright 1963



Pickled Scallions

Yield: 6 Half pints

18  bunches of scallions
1 c. salt
water
1/4 c. sugar
6 c.  white vinegar
6 tbs. whole allspice
1 tbs. white mustard seed
2 tbs. whole peppercorns
6  small hot peppers
6  bay leaves
6  cloves garlic (optional) 

Trim the scallions to fit into half pint Ball jars.Wash the scallions thoroughly and remove the outer layer, if it is tough or discolored.  Wash the vegetable again.

Place the scallions in layers in a large bowl, sprinkling each layer lightly with some of the salt. Cover with cold water and let stand twelve hours or overnight, making sure that the scallions remain submerged.

Drain the scallions, rinse them in fresh cold water, and drain again.

Combine the sugar and vinegar. Add the allspice, mustard seed and peppercorns, tied together in a cheesecloth bag. Bring to a boil and simmer fifteen minutes. Discard the spice bag.

Pack the scallions, standing upright, into six sterilized jars.Add one hot pepper, one bay leaf and one clove of garlic, if desired,to each jar.

Fill the jars to within 1/2 inch of the top with the boiling liquid and place the covers on loosely.

Place the jars on a wooden rack in a kettle half filled with boiling water.  Boil fifteen minutes, remove the jars with tongs and tighten the covers.  Store in a cool place.

SOURCE: "An Herb and Spice Cook Book", by Craig Claiborne, Copyright 1963


Pea Soup
 

  Boil peas until soft in water to cover.  Remove from heat and press
  through sieve.  If consistency is quite thick, add boiling water to
  make medium thick.  Put into clean jars.  Add 1 ts. salt to each
  quart jar if desired. Put on cap, screwing the band tight.  Process
  60 minutes, 10 lb.. pressure.

  Source: Kerr Canning Book



 

Canning Tomato Puree
 

  You'll need all the basic equipment for boiling water bath canning,
  plus a sieve or food mill and large preserving kettle. Use 1/2 pint
  or 1 pint jars only. The quantity of canned tomato puree will vary
  greatly, depending on how long you simmer the tomatoes.

  1. Select fresh, firm, red ripe, perfect tomatoes.

  2. Organize and prepare equipment and work area.

  3. Dip tomatoes into boiling water for 1 or 2 minutes to loosen the
  skins. Then dip them in cold water. Slip off skins and cut out cores.

  4. Cut tomatoes into chunks and place in a large preserving kettle.

  5. Cover and cook over low heat until the tomatoes are soft.

  6. Uncover and simmer over medium heat, stirring frequently, until
  very, very soft.

  7. Press through a sieve or food mill, then return to kettle and
  simmer until the mixture is the thickness of catsup, stirring
  frequently.

  8. Pour or ladle into hot 1/2 pint or pint jars to within 1/4 inch of
  the tops. Add 1/2 tsp. each of sugar and salt per pint, if
  desired.

  9. Wipe tops and threads of jars with a damp clean cloth.

  10. Put on lids and screw bands as manufacturer directs.

  11. Process in a boiling water bath for 30 minutes for 1/2 pints and
  pints.
 
 

  Source: Vegetable Gardening Encyclopedia Typos by Dorothy Flatman 1995



Canning Tomato Paste
 

8 qt peeled, cored, chopped tomatoes (about 48 large)
1 1/2 c.  chopped sweet red peppers-(about 3)
2  bay leaves
1 tbs. salt
1  garlic clove; peeled-if desired 

  This recipe makes about nine 1/2 pint jars. You will need all the
  basic equipment, in addition to a fine sieve.

  1. Organize and prepare ingredients, equipment, and work area.

  2. In a large preserving kettle, cook tomatoes, peppers, bay leaves,
  and salt for 1 hour over medium heat, stirring occasionally.

  3. Press through a fine sieve and return to kettle. Discard seeds and
  bay leaves.

  4. Add garlic, if used, and continue to cook over medium to medium low
  heat, stirring frequently, until tomato mixture is thick enough to
  mound on a spoon, about 2-1/2 hours. Remove garlic.

  5. Pour hot paste into hot 1/2 pint jars to within 1/4 inch of tops.
  Run a slim, non metal tool down along the insides of jars to release
  any air bubbles. Add additional paste, if necessary, to within 1/4
  inch of tops.

  6. Wipe tops and threads of jars with damp clean cloth.

  7. Put on lids and screw bands as manufacturer directs.

  8. Process in a boiling water bath 45 minutes.
 
 

  Source: Vegetable Gardening Encyclopedia Typos by Dorothy Flatman 1995


Canning Tomato Sauce
 

10 lb. tomatoes, peeled, cored and chopped
3 tbs. vegetable or olive oil
3 med. onions; finely chopped
3  garlic cloves; minced
1 1/2 tsp. oregano leaves; crushed
2  bay leaves
1 tbs. salt
1 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. black pepper
1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper, optional 

  This recipe makes about five 1/2 pint jars. You will need all the
  basic equipment, plus a sieve or food mill.

  1. Organize and prepare ingredients, equipment, and work area.

  2. In a large preserving kettle or saucepan, heat the oil. Add onion
  and garlic and cook over medium heat until tender but not brown,
  stirring frequently.

  3. Add all remaining ingredients and simmer about 2 hours, stirring
  occasionally.

  4. Press tomato mixture through food mill, discard seeds and bay
  leaves. Return tomato mixture to kettle and simmer over medium high
  heat until it reaches the thickness you prefer. Stir frequently.

  5. Ladle or pour hot sauce into hot jars to within 1/4 inch of tops.

  6. Wipe tops and threads of jars with damp clean cloth.

  7. Put on lids and screw bands as manufacturer directs.

  8. Process in a boiling water bath 30 minutes.
 

  Source: Vegetable Gardening Encyclopedia Typos by Dorothy Flatman 1995



Canning Vegetable Soup

2 qt. chopped, cored, peeled tomatoes (about 12 large)
1 1/2 qt. water
1 1/2 qt. cubed peeled potatoes-(about 6 medium)
1 1/2 qt. sliced peeled carrots-(about 12 medium)
1 qt. shelled lima beans
1 qt. uncooked corn kernels-(about 9 ears)
2 c.  sliced celery
2 c.  chopped onions
salt 

 You can use any combination of vegetables you like for this easy soup. Chop or dice the vegetables so pieces are about the same size.
 Process for the time of the vegetable that needs the longest processing. This recipe makes about 7 quarts. You'll need all the basic equipment for steam pressure canning.

  1. Organize and prepare ingredients, equipment, and work area.

  2. Combine all the ingredients except the salt in a large kettle,
  heat to boiling, and boil 5 minutes.

  3. Pour or ladle boiling soup into hot jars to within 1 inch of tops.

  4. Add 1/4 tsp. salt to each pint or 1/2 tsp. to each quart.

  5. Run a slim non metal tool down along the inside of each jar to
  release any air bubbles. Add more boiling soup, if necessary, to
  bring to within 1 inch of the tops.

  6. Wipe tops and threads of jars with a damp clean cloth.

  7. Put on lids an screw bands as manufacturer directs.

  8. Process at 10 pound pressure, 55 minutes for pints, 1 hour and 25
  minutes for quarts. Follow manufacturer's directions for your canner.
 

  Source: Vegetable Gardening Encyclopedia Typos by Dorothy Flatman 1995



Canning Stewed Tomatoes

4 qt. chopped, cored, peeled tomatoes (about 24 large)
1 c. chopped celery
1/2 c. chopped onion
1/4 c. chopped green pepper
1 tsp. sugar
2 tsp. salt 

  This recipe makes about 7 pints and must be processed in a steam
  pressure canner because of the low acid ingredients. You'll use all
  the basic equipment.

  1. Organize and prepare ingredients, equipment, and work area.

  2. Combine all ingredients in a large kettle or saucepan, heat to
  boiling and simmer 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

  3. Ladle or pour hot tomatoes into hot jars to within 1/2 inch of
  tops. Run a slim, non metal tool down along the inside of each jar to
  release air bubbles. Add additional hot liquid, if necessary, to
  within 1/2 inch of tops of jars.

  4. Wipe tops and threads of jars with a damp clean cloth.

  5. Put on lids and screw bands as manufacturer directs.

  6. Process at 10 pounds pressure, 15 minutes. Follow manufacturers
  directions for your canner.
 
 

  Source: Vegetable Gardening Encyclopedia



Canning Succotash
 

      3 lb To 6 lb. corn in husks-Makes 1 quart
      3 lb To 5 lb lima beans in pods-Makes 1 quart
  1 1/2 lb To 2-1/2 lb. green beans-Makes 1 quart

  Combine fresh corn with green beans or lima beans. Cut the corn from
  the cob as in whole kernel corn and mix with an equal amount, or half
  as many beans. You'll need all the basic equipment for steam pressure
  canning.

  1. Choose the freshest corn possible. Select same sized beans.

  2. Organize and prepare equipment and work area.

  3. Husk corn and remove silk. Wash well. Wash, drain, and shell lima
  beans and wash again. Wash the green beans, trim, string, and cut
  into 2 inch lengths.

  4. Boil corn in a large saucepan for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, in another
  pan boil beans 3 minutes. Drain both vegetables. Cut corn from cob
  and mix with hot, drained beans.

  5. Pack hot vegetables into hot jars to within 1 inch of tops. Add 1/2
  tsp. salt to each pint, 1 tsp. to quarts, if desired. Add
  boiling water to within 1 inch of tops of jars.

  6. Run a slim, non metal tool down along the inside of each jar to
  release air bubbles. Add more boiling water to within 1 inch of tops.

  7. Wipe tops and threads of jars with a damp clean cloth.

  8. Put on lids and screw bands as manufacturer directs.

  9. Process at 10 pounds pressure 1 hour for pints, 1 hour and 25
  minutes for quarts. Follow manufacturer's directions for your canner.
 
 

  Source: Vegetable Gardening Encyclopedia


Pickled Cauliflower

2 large heads of cauliflower
2 c. pearl onions
1 c. pickling salt
1 c. sugar
3 c. white vinegar
2 tsp. mustard seeds
1 tsp. celery seeds
1 small hot pepper

 
 

Wash the cauliflower and break into flowerets. Scald, cool, and peel the onions.

Mix the vegetables with the salt, add just enough water to cover, and let stand about 18 hours. Drain, rinse in cold water, and drain again.

Dissolve the sugar in the vinegar, add the seeds and hot pepper and bring to a boil. Add the vegetables and simmer for 10 minutes, or until the vegetables are barely tender.
Pack the vegetables into hot jars, fill the jars with the boiling hot liquid and seal. Makes 4 pints.



Aunt May's Pickled Green Tomatoes

15 lb. green tomatoes, sliced
1 c. pickling salt
1/2 tbs. powdered alum
2 qt. boiling water
2 c. apple cider vinegar
5 c. sugar
2 cinnamon sticks
handful of cloves

 

Arrange the tomatoes in layers in a large bowl or pickle crock, sprinkling salt between the layers. Let stand overnight.

The next day, drain tomatoes, sprinkle with alum, and pour the boiling water over them.
Let stand for 20 minutes. Drain, rinse, and drain again.

In an enamel or stainless steel kettle, combine vinegar, sugar and spices (tie the spices in a cheesecloth bag -- spice bag should be kept in the syrup right up to the very end).
Bring to a boil, stirring until sugar is dissolved, and boil rapidly for 3 minutes. Pour the syrup over the tomatoes and let stand overnight.

Next day, drain off syrup and bring to a boil. Pour over tomatoes and let stand again overnight.

On the fourth day, put syrup and tomatoes into the kettle, bring to a boil and simmer until the tomatoes are transparent. Pack the tomatoes into hot jars. Boil the syrup until it becomes quite thick or spins a long thread. Remove the spice bag and pour the syrup over the fruit, filling the jars, and seal. Makes 8 quarts.
 Seal and process for 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.



Quick Pickled Beets
(No heat processing necessary!)

 One bunch beets (5 small or 3 large)
 One large onion, white or yellow
 1 1/4 c. (10 oz.) white vinegar
 3/4 c. (6 oz.) canola (vegetable) oil
 salt and pepper to taste
 Clean quart size glass jar

 Cook the beets and slip them out of their skins. Slice into 1/4"
 rounds and set aside. Peel and slice onion into 1/4" rounds. Layer
 beets and onion in jar, alternating beet/onion/beet/onion, sprinkling
 salt and pepper between layers. When layers have reached top of
 jar, pour oil and vinegar over. Cap tightly and store in refrigerator
 -- they will keep for months, but mine never last that long!

 Beautiful served in a glass bowl at the dinner table, also make a
 very nice snack with fresh bread (I like rye) and a glass of beer.

 I also like serving hot, quartered beets for dinner garnished with
 2 Tablespoons of crumbled blue cheese and a tablespoon of toasted
 walnuts. (That amount serves 2 - 3) The flavors are wonderfully
 complementary.LakeWinni



 

Summer Garden in a Jar

(20 servings)

4 c. carrots, in 1/2 inch slices
4 c. green beans
10 c. cauliflower florets
1 c. onion rings
4 c. celery sticks (2 x 1/2 inch)
4 c. green pepper squares, 1 inch
6 c. sweet red pepper squares, 1 inch
2 c. pickling salt
12 c. water
12 c. white vinegar
2 c. granulated sugar
1 tbs. peppercorns
2 tsp. coriander seeds
1/3 c. mustard seeds
2 tbs. turmeric
2 c small unpitted black olives

 

In a large saucepan or preserving kettle, combine carrots, onions, celery,red and green peppers, beans and cauliflower. Sprinkle with salt and mix well, add water. Cover with a plate (to keep vegetables submerged)and let
stand for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse under cold water and drain again thoroughly. In a larger preserving kettle, combine vinegar, sugar and spices.

Bring to a boil, add vegetables and olives.Return to a boil , reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 10 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Pack vegetables into hot sterilized 1 pint jars; ladle liquid over vegetables leaving 1/8 inch head space. Seal. Process 15 minutes in boiling water bath. Serve with sandwiches, cold meats and cheeses. Use any left over syrup in cabbage salads. Makes 20 pints.
Source: Canadian Living
 


Tomato Catsup                             
Yields 20 Half Pints

8 qt. tomatoes
2 inches  stick cinnamon
8 med. onions                     
1 tbs.  whole peppercorns
2  long red peppers                  
1/2 tsp. dry mustard
3/4 c.  brown sugar             
1/2 clove  garlic
1 tbs. whole allspice            
1 1/2   bay leaves
1 tbs.  whole cloves               
2 c. cider vinegar
1 tbs. whole mace
1 tbs.  celery seed 

Wash the tomatoes and cut into pieces.
Slice and add the onions.
Remove the seeds and membranes from the long red peppers (not Bell Peppers) and add.
Simmer until soft.
Rub through a food mill.
Add the brown sugar.
Form a bag and put the allspice, cloves, mace, celery seed, peppercorns,  stick cinnamon, dry mustard, garlic and bay leaves in it.
Tie the bag very tightly and add to the tomato sauce.
Boil, stirring often until the volume is reduced by half.
 Remove and discard the spice bag and add the vinegar.
 Reduce heat and simmer the catsup for another 10 minutes.
 Pour into well sterilized jars, leaving about  1/4 " of headroom.
 Seal and process for 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.
 Store in a dry, cool location.


Homemade Sauerkraut

 2 pounds green cabbages, shredded
 2 tbs. coarse, kosher, or sea salt
 1 tsp. sugar.

Toss the cabbage, salt and sugar together in a large bowl. Let sit at room temperature for 1 hour, or until the cabbage has released a  lot of water. If there is not enough brine, the sauerkraut will go  bad before it ferments.  Place the cabbage in a large glass or glazed earthenware jar or canister, first squeezing the liquid from each  handful back into the bowl. After you've added all the sauerkraut, push it down with your fist to make it more compact. Then pour in
enough brine to cover the cabbage by at least 1 inch.  Insert a small plate, large enough to cover all the cabbage, inside the jar to keep the cabbage submerged. Drape the canister with a cloth and let sit at room temperature for 2-4 weeks.

 Check the plate after a couple of days. If it's floating on the brine, place another plate on
 top of the first to create more weight. It's ready when it tastes like sauerkraut.  Makes 5 c.


Pickled Peppers

Makes 5 pints

From the ``Ball Blue Book,'' published by Alltrista Corp.

1 pound Jalapenos peppers
1 1/2 pounds banana peppers
1/4 pound serrano peppers
6 c. vinegar
3 cloves garlic, crushed

Leave peppers whole or cut into 1 inch pieces. Combine peppers. Place vinegar,2 c. water and garlic in large pan. Bring mixture to boil; reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Discard garlic. Pack peppers into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space.

Ladle hot pickling liquid over peppers, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Remove air bubbles with a chopstick or nonmetal spatula. Adjust lids. Process pints 10 minutes in boiling water canner.

Remove jars immediately and let sit on counter until cool. Press middle of each cap; if it does not bounce back, jar is sealed. If it does pop back, either store jar in refrigerator and eat soon or reprocess with new lid.


Pickled Okra

Makes 4 pints

From the ``Ball Blue Book.''

3 1/2 pounds small okra pods
3 c. vinegar
1/3 c. pickling salt
2 tsp. dill seed
4 cloves garlic
2 small hot red peppers, cut in half

Trim stems off okra, being careful not to cut pods; set aside.
Combine 3 c. water, vinegar, salt and dill seed; bring to boil. Pack okra into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Put 1 garlic clove and 1/2 pepper in each jar.
Ladle hot liquid over okra, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Remove air bubbles with a chopstick or nonmetal spatula. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in boiling water canner.

Remove jars immediately and let sit on counter until cool. Press middle of each cap; if it does not bounce back, jar is sealed. If it does pop back, either store jar in refrigerator and eat soon or reprocess with new cap.


Pickled Zucchini
 

8  onions, thinly sliced
1 gal. zucchini, cut into 1/2 inch  slices
3  peppers, green, fine chopped
1/2 c.  salt
5 c. vinegar, cider
5 c.  sugar
1 1/2 tsp. turmeric
2 tbs. mustard seed
2 tsp. celery seeds
1 cinnamon stick, broken into 4 pieces

 

 In a large crock, layer the vegetables and salt.
Weight it down and let stand in refrigerator 6 hours.

 Drain the vegetables, rinse them and drain again.

 Put the remaining ingredients in a large kettle and bring to a boil.
Simmer for 10 minutes, then add the vegetables and remove from heat
immediately.

Turn into hot, sterilized jars and seal.
Process 5 minute in hot water bath.
 


Pickled Red Onions

1 c.  cider vinegar
1 c.  water
3 tbs. brown sugar
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp.  whole peppercorns
4 med.  red onions, very thinly  sliced 

 

Fill a tea kettle with water & bring to a boil.
Combine vinegar, water, sugar, salt & peppercorns in a medium sized
bowl & stir until the sugar is dissolved.
Place the onion slices in a colander in the sink & slowly pour all the
boiling water over them.
They will wilt slightly.
Drain well & transfer to the waiting marinade.
Cover & let marinate for several hours either in the fridge or at room
temperature.
Keep in the refrigerator & use as needed.
Also can be used in antipastos or on top of pizza.
They keep for a very long time



 

Canning Sweet Corn

There are two ways to can sweet corn, both involve using a pressure canner. When canning sweet corn, select ears containing slightly immature kernels, or of ideal size for eating fresh. Sweeter varieties or immature corn may cause browning in the canned product. A bushel of corn yields six to eleven quarts of canned corn.

Preparation for canning:

To prepare whole kernel corn for canning, blanch the ears for three minutes in boiling water. Cut the corn off the cob at about three fourths the depth of the kernel. Do not scrape the corn. You can hot pack or raw pack.

Pre treat new lids by placing in simmering water in a saucepan, or follow the manufacturer's directions on the package.

Hot pack method:
To hot pack, add 1 c. of hot water to each quart of kernels in a saucepan.
 Heat to boiling and simmer 5 minutes. Add 1 tsp. of salt per quart, if desired. Fill clean canning jars with corn and cooking liquid, leaving 1 inch head space.
Adjust jar lids and process.

Raw pack method:

To raw pack, fill the jars with the raw kernels of, leaving 1 inch head space.
Do not shake or press down.
Add 1 tsp. of salt per quart jar, if desired. Add fresh boiling water, leaving 1 inch head space.
Adjust jar lids and process.

Pressure Canning:

The recommended processing times for the hot pack and the raw pack methods for whole kernel corn are as follows:

When using a dial gauge pressure canner, process pints at 55 minutes at 11 PSI and quarts at 85 minutes at 11 PSI.
When using a weighted gauge pressure canner, process pints at 55 minutes at 15 PSI and quarts at 85 minutes at 15 PSI.



 

Mixed Vegetables and Soup

Source: NDSU Extension Service Nutrition Specialist

You can use a mixture of vegetables, dried beans or peas, meat, poultry or seafood for soups. The blend depends on family tastes.

Select, wash, and prepare vegetables, meat and seafoods as appropriate for the specific foods. Cover meat with water and cook until tender. Cool meat and remove bones. Cook vegetables. For each c. of dried beans or peas, add 3 c. of water, boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, soak 1 hour, and heat to boil. Drain and combine with meat broth, tomatoes, or water to cover. Boil 5 minutes. Add other vegetables and heat to boiling.
Caution: DO NOT THICKEN BEFORE CANNING. Salt to taste, if desired. Fill jars halfway with solid mixture. Add remaining liquid, leaving 1 inch head space. Adjust lids and process in a pressure canner.

Process soups in a dial gauge pressure canner at 11 to 13 pounds pressure or at 10 or 15 pounds pressure in a weighted gauge canner. Process hot packed pints for 60 minutes and quarts for 75 minutes. If the soup contains seafood, process for 100 minutes. Correct pressure is determined by the altitude.



Winter Squash and Pumpkin

Winter squash include the acorn squash, hubbard, butternut, butterc. and similar hard skinned varieties with deep yellow flesh.

Let winter squash develop on the vine until fully ripe. The rind should be very hard and unpierceable with a fingernail. The seeds are also hard, but you discard them when you prepare the squash. Handle winter squash differently from summer squash because of its hard skin.

Cut the smaller squashes in half, scoop the seeds out and bake the squash with the cut side down. Put a little water in the bottom of the pan to prevent drying of the flesh during baking. This steams and makes squash tender. It will take 45 minutes to an hour to cook the squash in a 375 º oven. Cut larger squashes into pieces and bake the same way.

You can also steam larger winter squashes or cook them in water.
Because of its high water content, baking is the best way to cook pumpkin.
Squash and pumpkin can be frozen.
Do not can mashed squash or pumpkin. If you want to can squash, peel it and cut into uniform one inch cubes. Cover cubes with water, bring to a boil, boil for 2 minutes then pack hot in clean jars. Add salt if desired and cover with hot cooking liquid, leaving one inch head space and seal with properly prepared lids. Process in a dial gauge pressure canner at 11 to 13 pounds pressure, 55 minutes for pints and 90 minutes for quarts.

In a weighted gauge pressure canner process at 10 or 15 pounds, 55 minutes for pints and 90 minutes for quarts. The correct amount of pressure is determined by the altitude.


Canning Dried Beans
 

Kidney, navy and other varieties of dried beans are good for canning or storage. In the home garden, mature beans left on the vine will dry naturally and you can store them in this way.

Water plays an important part in the final quality of canned beans. The harder the water used for soaking and blanching, the harder and firmer the finished beans. Excessive alkalinity will cause the beans to disintegrate somewhat, becoming soft and mushy.However, this will not be recognized until after processing.

To can dry beans, use one of the following methods: Place dried beans or peas in a large pot and cover with water. Soak 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Drain water. To quickly hydrate beans, you may cover sorted and washed beans with boiling water in a saucepan. Boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, soak 1 hour an drain. Cover beans soaked by either method with fresh water and boil 30 minutes. Add 1/4 tsp. of salt per pint or tsp. per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill jars with beans or peas and cooking water, leaving 1 inch head space. Adjust lids and process in a pressure canner.

Process in a dial gauge pressure canner at 11 to 13 pounds pressure or at 10 or 15 pounds pressure in a weighted gauge canner. Process pints for 75 minutes and quarts for 90 minutes. Pressure required depends on the altitude where canning is being done.


Canning Snap Beans
 

Select beans fresh from the garden. Use young, tender, firm and crisp beans. Wash them several times, lifting them out of the water so dirt that is washed off will not drain back over them. Trim and cut beans. Prepare only enough for one canner load at a time.

For hot pack method: Cover beans with boiling water and boil five minutes.

Pack hot beans loosely to one inch from the top of pint or quart jars. Add 1/2 tsp. salt to quarts, 1/4 tsp. to pints if desired. Cover with boiling water, leaving one inch head space. Wipe jar rims clean.

Place pretreated lids on jar so that sealing compound is next to the glass. Screw metal band on firmly but do not force. Pour two or three inches of boiling water into the pressure canner. Put filled jars inside. Fasten canner cover tight. Let steam vent for at least 10 minutes. Then close vent. Let pressure rise to recommended pressure.

When time is up, turn off burner. Gently remove canner from heat. When pressure falls to zero, slowly open vent. To remove cover, tilt far side up first. This keeps steam away from your face and hands. Remove jars from canner grasping glass shoulder, not the metal band. This two section vacuum lid is a self sealing type closure; do not tighten band. Cool jars on rack, out of drafts.

For raw pack method: Pack raw beans tightly to one inch from the top. If desired, add 1/4 tsp. salt to pints, 1/2 tsp. to quarts. Cover with boiling water. Leave one inch head space. Pre treat lids as directed and seal and process.

For both hot and raw pack, in a dial gauge pressure canner, process at 11 pounds pressure. In a weighted gauge canner, process at 15 pounds pressure. Process pints for 20 minutes and quarts for 25 minutes. Adjust for increases in altitude.



 

Canning Carrots

Fresh carrots store well under refrigeration, but if you do not have the space, consider canning carrots instead of freezing them.

Select fresh, young, tender and crisp carrots not more than one and one fourth inch in diameter. Wash, peel and rewash carrots. Avoid canning carrots with surface blemishes.

For the hot pack method: Cut into lengths, slice or dice. Cover with boiling water; bring to a boil and simmer for 5 minutes. Pack carrots into jars and leave a one inch head space. Add 1/4 tsp. salt to each pint if desired. Add hot cooking liquid or water, leaving 1 inch head space. Pre treat lids as directed. Work out air bubbles, wipe jar tops and seal and process.

For the raw pack method: Fill jar tightly to within 1 inch of top with raw carrots. Add 1/4 tsp. salt to each pint if desired. Fill to within 1 inch of top with boiling water.
Pre treat lids as directed. Work out air bubbles, wipe jar rim, seal and process.

Process carrots (hot or raw pack) in a dial gauge pressure canner at 11 pounds pressure. In a weighted gauge canner, process at 10 or 15 pounds pressure. Process pints for 25 minutes and quarts for 30 minutes.

Adjustment needs to be made for higher altitude.
 
Please follow canning instructions carefully and if in doubt,research canning methods.

 
 
 


 
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